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20130106
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like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget
] >> and before we hear from abbey i would like to welcome steve noe from the city college board. >> thank you abbey for giving me an opportunity to speak about milton today. some of you may have heard that city college is facing some troubles; that we are at risk of losing our license to operate a college, and some of you may have heard that there is a -- as there should be -- a cause to save city college, to keep it from going under. what some of you may not know is that milton marks for over a decade on the board was trying to save city college before it became a popular cause, long before it was attention of media attention or the focus of some of the leaders in san francisco. the model of city college of san francisco is the truth may make you free, and for 20 years or so the college lost its way. it stopped abiding by its own motto. fortunately milton often alone fought to have the college stay true to its motto and fortunately filton -- milton was the perfect person to carry out that mission. when i first met milton he just wanted to talk and i was running for office. we were in t
and you know what yo have and then you can treat the with what you learned in the first half with steve and the goal of triage happens to be th motto of nert "do the most good for the most people" and if there is an earthquake right no and ceiling collapsed and 40 people in here, and if i'm the one rescuer coming to you and the first person is not breathing and no pulse, would you want me to stop and do cpr for this person before i reache you and what if there are 500 people behind that and do cpr and i just have to open an air way and all patients fall unde under -- and i'm going to use colors and green, walking wounded and anybody that walks. d for delayed or yellow meaning you're hurt but you're not hurt enough. you're not hurt but that no not that bad an. and d is dead. and dead is the easiest one to determine. and how do we determine whether someone is dead? they're not breathing, right an steve said that several times and how do we know someone is not breathing? we look, listen, and feel and open the air way and we look to see if the chest is rising and listen to feel air and how
lived out by his gisat-grandson steve hearst. the now 80,000-acre hearst ranch is one of the largest and oldest working cattle ranches on the california coast. but when the new generation of hearsts took over, the question quickly became, how can the ranch keep thriving in the modern era? >> and it was my ranch manager cliff garrison who said, "gee, steve, it's a shame we couldn't do anything with our beef." and i said, "well, why couldn't we?" and so ultimately we started pursuing the grass-fed beef, and it fit right in with the whole conservation solution for the property. >> it's fun. it's a picnic every day. you know, we love it. it's a beautiful place and a great place to work. >> so from the shadow of their famous neighbor, the hearst ranch is stepping into the spotlight these days with their brand-few grass-fed beef operation. grazing on rolling hills with picturesque views, the hearst beef is billed as nothing being added but their history, and it's true. the cattle thrive on nutrient-rich native grasses that have been there since the days of william randolph hearst, and toda
. steve for farella braun & martel. yes we object to a continuance. i think the standard rules work perfectly fine. if you continue all matters with four members you have a lot of meetings you couldn't conduct business and we object with the continuance and ask that. >> since there are objections it requires a motion by the board to either continue or don't continue. >> i don't think there is good cause to continue so i would not be inclined to do that. >> pardon me i didn't understand that. >> there is no good cause to continue so i wouldn't make a motion to continue. >> looks like we will continue mr. cobb. >> okay. so we can start your seven minutes. >> while before you start the seven minutes let me get an answer to the second question. has each member of the board read the briefs in their entirety? >> we received the briefs last friday. >> has any member of the board read each of the three briefs? >> i don't believe that the purpose of this meeting -- the purpose of the purpose is not intogz of the board and the respondent's side of the argument and your side and for the boar
and gentlemen, please welcome the cast of steve silver's beach blanket babylon. [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the san francisco 49ers -- >> [inaudible] >> woo. >> laughter. come on. the san francisco giants. [cheers and applause] that's better. the detroit tigers. and that can only happen in the greatest city in the world, san francisco! [cheers and applause] >> "san francisco, open your golden gate". (music). [cheers and applause] "san francisco, when i get home again i'm coming home". [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome giants' announcer renel brooks moon. >> what's up everybody? hello san francisco giants fans. [cheers and applause] how are you doing? this is so nice. we had to do it twice; right? thank you all for coming out today. and ladies and gentlemen it is my honor to welcome you to the official city celebration honoring your 2012 world series champions san francisco giants. now, as we gather together as a community today to celebrate this joyous occasion we do want to take a moment first to recognize those impacted by hurricane sand
some of the, for their love and support. thank you. [applause] >> steve castile. [applause] >> i started working for the public works department 15 years ago. we are like a family. it is a very close-knit group. i think, because of that, we get the best out of people. one of the problems we encountered in the city was we were not able to pay our vendors and contractors. people were entering data inconsistently. documents were always getting lost. payments were not going out. the numbers do not add up. everything has to flow horizontal and vertical leap. we created several modules to make it easier for contractors to attach the documents in a standardized format. we do not have to go deeper anymore. i don't have a formal education in i.t., however, i have deployed some systems when i was working for the industry, and i brought in young, energetic staff to help. we implemented this. it took three months. people knew when they were going to get paid. i think we have a happy contractor community. >> these system improvements have really it increased service to our clients and reduced
president mike hardeman. thank you. and commissioner steve nakaja. and i want to introduce our police department deputy chief at the airport, the guy in charge. david chen is here. from the adjacent coast guard facility, the commander. and we have staff members from our congressional delegation. we have staff members from senator feinstein's office, nancy pelosi's office, and others. thank you for joining us today. [applause] throughout our history, safety and security has always been our priority. safety and security of our passengers, and safety of our employees. we are building on that commitment by commissioning what is the first fire rescue boat house facility on the west coast of the united states. more simply -- [airplane noise] we are at an airport. this is the first marine emergency response facility on the west coast. more simply, we can call it the first fireboat house at an airport. it is a core value for the airport team that we have worked together to provide an exceptional airport, that we are innovating, and that we work in partnership. this is a partnership between th
'll raise the temperature to the low sixties. we'll add some heat. >> and steve says they've steadily seen an increase in avocado consumption. on average, each american now consumes about 3 avocados per year. but steve thinks that will increase to 5 or 6 avocados within the next couple of years. so whether you try avocados in guacamole at your next party or try them to support farmers like the bruces, the time is indeed ripe to try some california avocados today. for "california country," i'm tracy sellers. >> brought to you by allied insurance, a member of the nationwide family of companies, which also includes nationwide insurance. on your side. >> today on food 101, we are talking about potatoes. and here to help us is greg corrigan, senior director of produce and floral here at raley's. all right, potato, pot-ah-to, whatever you call it. i don't know. >> you say potato, i say pot-ah-to. >> right. that's why we'll go to dinner tomorrow. but what do i need to know about picking out a good potato? >> well, there's--first of all, there's lots of choices when it comes to potatoes. >> ok. >>
, mr. guttle. >> >> good evening commissioners. steve guttle from farella braun & martel on behalf of the permit holders. let me briefly describe the project to you. 800 brotherhood way is a 7.7-acre site and approved for a subdivision with 182 units to be built. it's a complicated project. it required a host of permits since 2005 all of which are now in place. it is has been a challenge to finance the project during the recession and financing stopped across the country. that situation is resolving itself and the project has a new sponsor and financing is in place and posed to start construction in the new few months pr this appeal is denied. the planning commission adopted this mitigation and conditional use permit in 2005 and update this in 2005. there was no appeal of the pud to the board. the appellants, the same group sued the city in 2005. the superior court upheld in 2006 and the board of appeals did the same in 2007. there was a tree removal permit issued and this board up leld that permit in 2007 and this city and the board was sued and the superior court denyd
with turner construction giving you our later construction update. >> good morning directors, steve with turner construction. even with the holidays it was a very -- [ inaudible ] you have heard some of these statistics already earlier this morning, but the last period, the month of december there were no recordable or lost time incidents on the project. we have -- you saw the 700,000 plus man hours to-date throughout the entire project and taking into account the current work on the transit center, all the work under webcor's contract, 600,000 craft hours through the end of 2012. and that is about 38,000 completed over the last period. the most significant progress has been made in the excavation and there is some statisticks there of where we are. the ultimate news is that we're about 50% complete with the overall excavation of the project. you heard 27 5,000 cubic yards have been removed. so we're right on track. there some of the other highlights, the water, the auxiliary water system work continues on mission street, working on 2nd back towards the beale street end of the
and park department. it's my incredible pleasure and honor to introduce you are mfac award winner, steve, ste castil. >> i would like to thank spur and mfac. thank you for this honor. being selected to receive such a prestigious award is such a great honor, but i think even greater considering all the top candidates. when i graduated from uc-davis, i learned the theory of being a manager. i needed something to show the reality but i quickly learned the best way to acquire these skills was to watch and work with senior managers in the rec and park department. i've been fortunate to work with three outstanding managers. they were instrumental in my growth as a manager. i thank them. another ingredient needed to be a successful manager is to have a great team. my supervisory team -- may have been instrumental in the golf and turf operations by completing tasks to the highest standards possible of any group of people i've ever seen. i would also like to thank the gardening staff, the teamsters, the operating engineers, everyone who makes my operation possible, even down to the local vendors
-packard or steve jobs. the seats we plant brings the vast forests of new products and new technologies and new patents in the future. that is where we have to -- we have to keep our eye on the main thought here. that is the discipline, the imagination, and the investment. that is what makes california -- that is why people are still coming here. they're not staying in colorado, i am sorry to say. they're right here. [applause] >> just briefly, setting aside plunder for a moment. >> i am sorry about plunder. it is a big part of wealth creation. >> could you talk briefly about your turn initiative? >> it is going well. mike rossi is leading the charge. i have met with what i think will be the next president of china. we have delegations from china to come here. we're sending delegations there. this is not just business as usual. we're getting detailed committees and proposals, a couple of the key states. we want good coming this way. we want good going out way. -- goods coming this way and we want goods going out that way. >> are you doing anything like that? >> we have been working on the north
't agree more. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> good afternoon, steve mcdonald. chris and i have been friends since we pledged the fraternity at uc berkeley in 1978. i want to first thank chris's family for allowing me the honor of speaking today as we celebrate chris's amazing life. i look at this crowd. i try to figure out how much he achieved so much while making personal and professional connections and lifelong friends all over the world. this beautiful light-filled rotunda is
brother. i couldn't agree more. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> good afternoon, steve mcdonald. chris and i have been friends since
. to his left, colonel laura yeager, 40th combat aviation brigade. to her left, commander steve everett, to his left lieutenant colonel dana, marine corps installation west. thank you. let me go ahead and start off by talking a little bit and just going back over some of the discussions yesterday that i think are going to play into this discussion. we had vice admiral beeman talk a little bit yesterday about capabilities and vice admiral zunkoff talked about partnerships, unity of effort, unity of command. mayor lee talked about dod efforts, expertise, community efforts and as we go into all those discussions today you will see best practices applied during the 10 years from those fires. i have the pleasure of working for administrator fuget in fema headquarters. fema's role is to coordinate response between state and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it's go to see the department of defense is incorporating this within the catastrophe policy that was spoken
millionaires. it is the belief that you owe backe to a country that has helped to make you what you are. steve jobs -- we had a tough column in the last issue. it was tough not about apple labor practices in china. here you had a man of great wealth was talking about cutting taxes and never really gave of his philanthropic wealth. poor bill gates, he gets nailed for being so square. you can disagree with some things. but he is out there. >> all of them out there now came a little late to the party. they got very rich, very young. i wanted to leave some time for audience questions. i have not read more questions from the audience because they are also good. usually it is the guy with the aluminum hat on getting cia messages. [laughter] not really. if you want to line up, we have a few more minutes at the microphones. we will take a few questions. please make sure that you make them questions. >> i have been interested in americorps and other related programs. from what i can tell, you do not support it or talk about it very much. the tea party is advocating limiting national service. president
in our state. steve mecher and thank you for being here. ongoing support. got the sf giants hat, yes. mike cureo and thanks for being here and the construction trades and we have been working with you to get the folks trained over the years. it's a wonderful time, and the chairman -- and the chairman of our san francisco metropolitan transportation agency who has been a long time champion of public transit, a regular muni rider, someone who loves the city and has been at the forefront of not only a great transportation but has his head in our city and programs and wonderful services. please come on up. chairman tom nolan. [applause] >> leader pelosi asked me what is of going to say after reverend frong. i didn't have a chant rate for that. this is a great day for san francisco. this is a labor of love. we know the economic and transit values of this. as an agency we are committed and not only committed to bringing this fruition on time but under budget as well. is that good? and we will continue the vil against of all of our assets and focusing on the priority number one is s
wins with joe montana, steve young and coming down market street. as we did with the giants a year and a half to two years ago. these were incredible inspirational opportunities we have, now hosting a super bowl. being part of a bay area effort to bring this incredibly helpful event that isn't just one few hours worth of games. there's all kinds of events that happen during super bowl week. i believe that the bulk of them will be hosted here in san francisco because this will be where we reflect strong infrastructure of tourism, where we host things and do well. this is what san francisco is about. we have an incredible committee of people that have volunteered and put forth i want to be part of this team effort to, build a bay area super bowl event that will be not only long lasting for the sports itself but with daniel's leadership and supervisor feral that's been such an incredible partner in the dialogue to help us form our ideas. and for somebody who's spnt his personal time creating the educational links between our school district and kids and parents, to created a decisiona
, anything. basil pesto. >> supplying steve with all of that versatile greenery is bay area legend armanino foods. in business since the 1920s when the family supplied fresh vegetables and herbs to the growing italian community in san francisco, they are now the leader in fresh-from-the-farm pesto, all thanks to a special recipe for success. >> recipe for pesto actually started with my grandmother, and we thought it was a great product, but no one knew about it. and so, we tried it @nd processed, brought it to the supermarket, and it started to work out. >> the armanino family says the first year, they sold only 1,000 or so cases. but now, they are shipping upwards of a million cases annually. and they attribute much of their success to their special connection to agriculture. >> a lot of people don't realize just about everything you eat today, you knop, originates on the farm. a lot of people don't even consider that or don't think about it. whether it's a cupcake or whether it's a hamburger, whether it's bread, everything starts on the farm. >> everything we eat does, indeed, start on th
steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical personnel in military and civilian hospitals and many other options like that are possible. >> thank you. for our guests, what questions do you have? again, we have some microphones that can go around, we have two up front. >> very interesting. i have a question, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. di
steve teuber wanted me -- he wanted to address it to you himself when you had the meeting with the city attorney. but we had been told by the commission secretary that this was not on the agenda, you know. we're having a lot of problems getting notice. it isn't that the -- that it's a plot. it isn't that we don't receive courtesy from the director who actually, if it weren't for the director a couple of times notifying me, there wouldn't be a single opponent or single paid advocate at some things like the court hearings because once you select four people, those people don't necessarily want anybody else to participate. and they even have done things like when the director had a meeting and wanted participation from the neighborhood, told, you know, somebody, well, this is only a private meeting and it's only for people who are right at the site right around the corner, so, therefore, make sure that i and anybody else won't be there except those who are selected. i guess the ones who were selected were thought to be people who would be interested in negotiating. but it turned out they w
's at about 40 degrees. we'll rase the temperature to the low 60s. we'll add some heat. >> and steve said they've steadily seen an increase in avocado consumption. on average, each american now consumes about 3 avocados per year, but steve thinks that will increase to 5 or 6 avocados within the next couple of years. so whether you try avocados in guacamole at your next party, or try them to support farmers like the bruces, the time is indeed ripe to try some california avocados today. for "california country," i'm tracy sellers. well, that is gonna do it for e show today. if you have any questions about anything you've seen, check out our website at californiacountry.org. and we'll see you again next week on "california country." [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation]
, steve dixon, and jack hirsch man. >> you can black as out of the press, blog and arrest us, tear gas, mace, and shoot us, as we know very well, you will, but this time we're not turning back. we know you are finished. desperate, near the end. hysterical in your flabbergastlyness. amen. >> after the readings, the crowd headed to a reception upstairs by wandering through the other gallery rooms in the historic home. the third floor is not usually reserved for just parties, however. it is the stage for live performances. ♪ under the guidance of musical curators, these three, meridian has maintained a strong commitment to new music, compositions that are innovative, experimental, and sometimes challenging. sound art is an artistic and event that usually receives short shrift from most galleries because san francisco is musicians have responded by showing strong support for the programming. ♪ looking into meridian's future, she says she wants to keep doing the same thing that she has been doing since 1989. to enlighten and disturbed. >> i really believe that all the arts have a seriou
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)